Vergara1 | The Forest, The Farms, And The Finance: Why The Tolo River People Turned To Carbon Finance

About This Series
Colombia’s Tolo River People collectively own 32,000 acres of rainforest, and that forest feeds the river on which they depend. But ownership means nothing if you can’t protect it. Four years ago, they began harnessing carbon finance to save the forest and preserve their way of life. This series takes us into their thinking and their strategy. It has been adapted from “Modern day forest conservation: A Colombian community protecting its rainforest one carbon credit at a time,” by Tanya Dimitrova.

An excerpt also appeared in Grist, as In the Colombian rainforest, an experiment in community-driven climate protection.

Part One: How The Tolo River People Of Colombia Harnessed Carbon Finance To Save Their Rainforest provides an overview of the project.

Part Two: The Forest, The Farms, And The Finance: Why The Tolo River People Turned To Carbon Finance examines the drivers of deforestation in and around the Tolo River Community.

Part Three: The Tolo River Project Takes Shape follows the development of the project itself – its conception, its implementation, and its challenges.

You can also find the REDD Desk Project summary of this project here.