LEAF publishes Asian REL Workshop Proceedings

LEAF is a five year program that will continue to engage regional governments, forestry and climate mitigation specialists and universities in a technical capacity building program focused on REDD+ Readiness.   The program also works on policy and market incentives for improved forest management and land use planning, develops innovative pilot interventions, and strengthens regional platforms and mechanisms for sharing lessons learned and scaling up innovation.

View the slideshow and view the proceedings here

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The TEEB Climate Issues update

This update from our TEEB study presents a sub-set of early conclusions which relate to climate change. A fuller report on these and several other areas of relevance to national and international policy-makers will be published in November 2009. However, in view of the climate change conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2009, we thought it appropriate to publish our climate-related conclusions and recommendations more urgently for policy-makers, negotiators, and the general public.

Offsets the Queensland Way

The Queensland Government Environmental Offsets Policy provides an overarching framework for environmental offsets in Queensland. The policy provides a consistent and transparent approach to the use of offsets. It contains principles and guidelines for developing and applying more detailed ‘specific-issue’ policies for offsetting important environmental values such as vegetation or fish habitats.

Currently, offsets use in Queensland can be characterised as a compliance mechanism as they are required to meet development conditions. Developers will face higher costs if they need an offset and this provides a greater incentive to avoid and minimise impacts on areaswith significant environmental values. The paper canvasses opportunities to now move to develop efficient offset markets in Queensland.

Green Power Partnership Webinar: Green Power Markets and the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI)

EPA hosted a webinar on October 23 to answer basic questions about how green power retailers can retire allowances through the voluntary renewable energy set-aside (VRE) in many of states participating in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), and the importance of doing so for the green power market. State RGGI Administrators, Tracking System Representatives with APX, EPA officials, and representatives from the Center for Resource Solutions (CRS) provided information and answered questions. Speakers addressed:

* The eligibility criteria for retiring allowances
* The roles of Partners, providers, and regulators
* How and who must apply, and on what time schedule
* Where to go for more information

State of the Voluntary Carbon Market webinar

APX, New Carbon Finance and Ecosystem Marketplace would like to invite you to a complimentary Webinar, The Voluntary Carbon Markets: Current State of Affairs. You may already know that the global voluntary carbon markets continue to experience dramatic growth involving everyone from corporations and project developers to financial services and NGOs. But what’s really going on with these markets and is it time for you to get involved or increase your participation?

This educational event will provide an inside look at some of the latest information on these exciting markets covering topics including:

* Current growth estimates, VER pricing trends, and market predictions
* Emission reduction projects that are creating offsets
* Who is driving demand and why they are buying
* Standards, their role in the markets, utilization, and trends
* Substantiating environmental claims using carbon offsets
* Project offset registries and market infrastructure solutions

Conservation Cowboys

California’s booming population over the past decade has meant a lot of new development in the form of housing and roadways; taking large swaths of agricultural range and farm land with it.

Environmentalists say this growth has delivered the state to a crossroads where the extinction or survival for many types of species, wildlife and natural habitat will be decided. Enter modern-day growth, fueled by disappearing lands, a state program from the 90’s-conservation banking. Like a financial institution protect dollars and cents, a conservation bank works to protect the bucolic landscapes and the creatures living upon it and dually rewards the land owner by staving off development, while also providing an additional revenue stream. The best friends to the Federal regulators who oversee these banks are the very agricultural land owners who are more commonly tagged as being at the wrong intersection of those crossroads.

Chris Burrous meets traditional cattle rancher turned conservationist, Marden Wilber. Marden discovered conservation banking when a chunk of his grazing operation wasn’t suitable for conversion to vineyards. Marden hoped the vineyards would produce a badly needed additional revenue stream from the sale of grapes. When that plan didn't work, a colleague suggested converting that chunk of land instead to a conservation bank as means of not only producing additional income, but at the same time allowing Marden's land to remain just as it was.

Marden contacted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to find out more, and the rest, Marden says, is history. We’ll meet Ken Sanchez, a biologist with U.S.F.W.S. and learn how Marden's bank works, what endangered species it supports and how agriculture plays a vital role in these banks.

In addition to private land holders, conservation banks are also being established by commercial conservation organizations. Wildlands Incorporated is the largest of these types of conservationists – conservationists who are also “cowboys”.

We’ll also visit the Jenny Farms Conservation Bank in Yolo County. This bank is a Swainson's Hawk preserve and a perfect example of the beneficial coexistence between agricultural multi-use land management and preservation of our natural resources.

Additional Info:
Wildlands
www.wildlandsinc.com

Explore the rest of Episode 911

Net Pay: Economic Analysis of Mangrove Restoration

A presentation given at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies International Society of Tropcial Forestry conference, March 2, 2007. The presentation discusses methods of economic valuation for the ecosystem services of mangrove restoration. It also deals with efforts in Kenya to restore mangrove forests and to ensure that the local people involved in the restoration process benefit economically from it.

Background: The History and Status of Wetland Mitigation Banking and Water Quality Trading

This presentation was delivered by two of the United States Protection Agency's senior policy makers at the National Forum on Synergies Between Water Quality Trading and Wetland Mitigation Banking in July 2005. It gives the major elements of both wetland mitigation banking and water quality trading in the United States. Through timelines and data it gives an orientation to some the evolution of these two market mechanisms as potentially useful policy tools.

Can a Markets for Ecosystem Services Work?

This presentation was given during the Payment for Ecosystem Services session of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The session aimed to highlight the importance of defining the service, buyers and establishing a system for verification; identify existing tools and databases that can be used to assist in market development; explore markets as an institution that can deal with the exchange mechanisms that govern allocation of traditionally unpriced goods and services; identify institutional barriers that have prevented markets from developing so far, current conditions and technical innovations that make this an opportune time, and needs from institutions to effectively market ecosystem services.

Private lands and public ecosystem benefits

This presentation was given at the Thinking Bigger about Incentive Programs – Tools and Innovations panel of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The panel explored: applying ecosystem services concepts to Southern forests, defining the federal role in purchasing ecosystem services, and incentives examples and innovations from the South.

Incentive Payments for Ecosystem Services: A Southeastern Perspective

This presentation was given at the Thinking Bigger about Incentive Programs – Tools and Innovations panel of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The panel explored: applying ecosystem services concepts to Southern forests, defining the federal role in purchasing ecosystem services, and incentives examples and innovations from the South.

Conservation Incentives for Southern Forestlands

This presentation was given at the The Future of Incentives panel of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC which explored various landowners' management objectives and the economic realities of forestland ownership, what works and what doesn't work, and the potential of future landowner assistance tools and programs?

A Forest Carbon Market to Sustain Our Forestlands: Recent Developments in California

This presentation was given at the State of the art in ecosystem service markets session of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The session explored: Carbon markets, wetlands banking and mitigation credits, conservation easements, biodiversity, nontimber products, and water quality. With an eye towards next steps with incentives, tax policies, subsidies; addressing market failures and overuse issues; and regional differences in governance institutions.

Endangered Species Conservation Banking

This presentation was given at the State of the art in ecosystem service markets session of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The session explored: Carbon markets, wetlands banking and mitigation credits, conservation easements, biodiversity, nontimber products, and water quality. With an eye towards next steps with incentives, tax policies, subsidies; addressing market failures and overuse issues; and regional differences in governance institutions.

Putting Natural Capital to Work

Putting Natural Capital to Work lays out the US Forest Service's view of and role in promoting payments for ecosystem services.

The Nuts and Bolts of Creating Markets for Ecosystem Services

This Paying for Ecosystem Services panel discussion was given during the Payment for Ecosystem Services session of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The panel covered topics such as: Nuts and Bolts: How do we enable ecosystem service markets? Problems and Opportunities: What ecosystem service markets are most promising in the US? Why don’t we currently see more of them? Measurement: How do we know what we’re buying?

Financing Ecosystem Services

This Paying for Ecosystem Services panel discussion was given during the Payment for Ecosystem Services session of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The panel covered topics such as: Nuts and Bolts: How do we enable ecosystem service markets? Problems and Opportunities: What ecosystem service markets are most promising in the US? Why don’t we currently see more of them? Measurement: How do we know what we’re buying?

Case Study from Arkansas: Carbon, Habitat and Water

This Paying for Ecosystem Services panel discussion was given during the Payment for Ecosystem Services session of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The panel covered topics such as: Nuts and Bolts: How do we enable ecosystem service markets? Problems and Opportunities: What ecosystem service markets are most promising in the US? Why don’t we currently see more of them? Measurement: How do we know what we’re buying?

Markets for Ecosystem Services (ES)

This presentation was given during the Payment for Ecosystem Services session of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The session aimed to highlight the importance of defining the service, buyers and establishing a system for verification; identify existing tools and databases that can be used to assist in market development; explore markets as an institution that can deal with the exchange mechanisms that govern allocation of traditionally unpriced goods and services; identify institutional barriers that have prevented markets from developing so far, current conditions and technical innovations that make this an opportune time, and needs from institutions to effectively market ecosystem services.

Environmental Benefits and Ecosystem Services and Needed Links for Stacking Credits

This presentation was given during the Payment for Ecosystem Services session of the 'New Currency for Conservation' conference in Washington, DC. The session aimed to highlight the importance of defining the service, buyers and establishing a system for verification; identify existing tools and databases that can be used to assist in market development; explore markets as an institution that can deal with the exchange mechanisms that govern allocation of traditionally unpriced goods and services; identify institutional barriers that have prevented markets from developing so far, current conditions and technical innovations that make this an opportune time, and needs from institutions to effectively market ecosystem services.

The Onset of Offsets

This presentation outlines the key points of the IUCN/Insight Investments report Biodiversity Offsets: Views, experience, and the business case.

Ecosystems for Sale in an Unequal World

A summary of 7 presentations made at the Katoomba Group's forum: Ecosystems for Sale in an Unequal World. Topics covered include: What are Markets for Ecosystem Services?; Carbon Payments for Biodiversity Conservation; Watershed Payments and Biodiversity, Direct Payments for Habitat and Species Conservation; Biodiversity Offsets, Mitigation and Compensation; Panel Discussion: Ensuring Equity in Ecosystem Service Markets; and Interactive Conversation: Threats, opportunities and next steps.